Monthly Archives: March 2016

CHIROPRACTIC AND PROPRIOCEPTION: TIC VLOG EPISODE 3

Chiropractic and proprioception have been intertwined for over one hundred years. In TIC VLOG Episode 3, I answer a question about this topic in relation to the book Segmental Neuropathy. Arthur Heintz, DC, linked chiropractic and proprioception in 1912. He also influenced Verner and R.J. Watkins. They were two of chiropractic’s most important theorists of the last century. Much of today’s subluxation theory can be traced to their research.

BIG IDEAS FROM THIS EPISODE

  • Arthur Heintz was not only the first person (besides D.D. Palmer) to integrate chiropractic and proprioception but he may have also been the only chiropractor to have met Speransky.
  • Heintz brought together chiropractic and proprioception and the concept of Innate Intelligence.
  • R.J. Watkins was inspired by Verner and Heintz to make sense of the “reflex technics.”
  • One of Watkins’ greatest achievements was to describe the neurophysiology of “light” adjustments (such as Logan Basic).
  • One central idea from Segmental Neuropathy was Local Sensorial Conversation Tone. The subluxated joint segment included a “buzz,” a “detuning,” and led to “neurological disintegration.”
  • Stephenson’s concept of the Normal Vertemere Cycle was congruent with these theories.

Resources for this Episode:

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* Music written, arranged, and performed by Dan Mills, Mark Goodell, Adam Podd

 

NEW THOUGHTS ABOUT CHIROPRACTIC PIONEERS GONSTEAD AND FIRTH: TIC VLOG EPISODE 2

Episode 2 of the TIC VLOG includes some of my thoughts about chiropractic pioneers Gonstead and Firth. In this episode I answer a question about Gonstead’s life and influences. This gave me an opportunity to share some of my newest thoughts on the topic with you. I was recently given a copy of Firth’s technique manual from the 1940s at Lincoln Chiropractic College. When we look at this manual in the context of the first Gonstead seminars some interesting connections arise.

BIG IDEAS IN THIS EPISODE

  • Gonstead went to Palmer in the early 1920s at the peak of that school’s initial growth.
  • Firth, Burich, Vedder, and Palmer not only wrote greenbooks but collaborated on the Palmer technic manual.
  • Firth led the Lincoln Chiropractic College in the 1940s and developed his own technic program.
  • Two Lincoln students were the first teachers of the Gonstead Seminars.

Resources from this episode

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* Music written, arranged, and performed by Dan Mills, Mark Goodell, Adam Podd

 

QUESTIONS ABOUT D.D. PALMER’S THEORIES OF CHIROPRACTIC ANSWERED: TIC VLOG EPISODE 1

This is the first episode of my new video blog. On these short videos I will be talking about my latest research into the history and philosophy of chiropractic. I will also answer questions. TIC VLOG Episode one includes a question from Pat MC about D.D. Palmer’s original contribution and how it was different from osteopathy.

BIG IDEAS IN THIS EPISODE

  • D.D. Palmer’s chiropractic technique was probably not influenced by osteopathic methods.
  • Palmer’s earliest chiropractic ideas included nerve stretching and nerve tension.
  • D.D. Palmer’s concept of nerve impingement dates to 1903.
  • By the time of his final writings Palmer developed his theories of the neuroskeleton and tone.

Resources from this episode

SEND ME YOUR QUESTIONS FOR FUTURE EPISODES